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Meet girlfriend or boyfriend > 30 years > Look what you made me do instrumental joyner

Look what you made me do instrumental joyner

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Swift wrote and produced the song with her co-producer Jack Antonoff. Right Said Fred band members are also credited as songwriters, as it interpolates the melody of their song " I'm Too Sexy " The song broke a string of records, including the record for the most plays in a single day on Spotify. It also received Diamond certification in Brazil. The song received a polarized response from music critics. On August 23, , Swift announced that the first single from her upcoming sixth album, titled Reputation , would come out the following night.

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Joyner Lucas (Look what you made me do) lyrics

Jackie Joyner-Kersee: Track Star Chasing Dreams, Building Community

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Joyner Lucas released his second album, , on June 16, The album is made up of 16 tracks and contains features from Mystikal, Snoh Aalegra, and Stefflon Don.

On this new project, Joyner does a great job of showcasing his talent, particularly in his fast rapping speed, ability to rap from different perspectives, and use of serious topics. However, his shortcomings are also present. The songs sometimes go on too long, his lack of vocal talent hurts him at certain points, and his attempts to tie the album together thematically are a little spotty.

In most cases, the reply given to his voicemail will lead into the next song in some way, kind of like what Kendrick Lamar did on his revolutionary album To Pimp a Butterfly. On the next song, Joyner reflects on how his life has changed throughout the course of his career. After making a mark in the rap game, he has gained more interest from women and is slightly more well off. However, he still struggles financially and the track is a way for him to accept that life could be better but appreciate what he has.

He will also keep striving for more. The message is strong and the lyrics support it well. The beat also helps convey a feeling of appreciation. The problem with the track is that it goes on for way too long. It is over 6 minutes 2nd longest song on an album filled with lengthy tracks and the verses begin to sound repetitive when he speaks on the same topic for so long. This is one of the major problems that most tracks on this album face.

The Mystikal feature, however, feels a little unnecessary. It seems like the song could have ended right before the feature and it would have been fine.

Throughout the song, the bill is spent, stolen and found, and it eventually causes death. After it is lost for three weeks, a homeless man finds it on the ground and uses it to buy food. However, because he went to the same store that got robbed earlier in the song, and because it had the phone number on it that the store clerk recognized, the homeless man was shot and killed by the clerk at the end of the song.

However, the only person who paid the ultimate price was a poor, innocent man. The only shortcoming of the track is that it is somewhat lacking in replay value. This track is told from the perspective of a man who lives in poverty and tried to work through it but has run out of options. This is effective because Joyner goes off in the verses, rapping at a high speed and coming up with solid bars. The song does have its share of hiccups, like when the 1st verse ends abruptly and the beginning of the song is repeated.

The random saxophone at the end also felt out of place. However, the track was still solid overall as it can be a hype song but also has lyrics that put you into the world of a desperate man who will do anything to provide for himself and his family. It gives some sympathy for people who choose to commit crimes. The first verse is a son speaking to his father, while the second is a daughter to her mother. The children mention all the bad things their parents do, such as going to strip clubs, breaking the law, falling for men, smoking, etc.

In the third verse, however, the children wish to have a better role model to look up to. In the music video, you can see the boy looking at pictures of athletes while the girl looks at female singers.

The children say they want to be just like their role models. The message comes off a little strange because the kids call their parents judgmental while the kids themselves are the ones judging. He also makes the song very repetitive. The verses have many forced rhymes that make for an awkward listen.

Luckily, the horror show that was the last track is forgotten and this track is here to soothe you after the hot garbage you just heard. The song even has an interesting theme attached to the title. In each verse, Joyner raps about how a relationship began sweet and then eventually soured. The first verse is about a child and their mother, while the first verse is about a girl and her boyfriend. Joyner executes this, and the entire song, very well.

It is overall soothing but also very sad. Joyner once again does a great job of rapping from other points of view and offers an interesting take on the different ways that a lullaby can be used.

It is actually one of the deeper songs on the album. The track is further muddled by two strange, very hopeless-sounding monologues and a very long interlude. Snoh Aalegra, who is featured on the hook and outro not including the regular voicemail , does a pretty good job, but also just adds more complexity to a very confusing track.

A lot of the elements on this track are interesting on their own, but it feels like Joyner just threw them all together haphazardly and the result is a little awkward. This is a turn-up song with a strong beat where Joyner is at his most arrogant.

He delivers line after line praising himself and does a solid job of keeping up the energy as he transitions from a powerful first verse to a fast-paced second verse.

Surprisingly, Stefflon Don was arguably the highlight of this track. She carried the energy, flowed well on the beat and came through with some strong bars.

Both Joyner and Stefflon were loud, braggadocious and hard-hitting in this fun track. The message is also somewhat different. Throughout the album, Joyner has included many voicemails from women talking about him, usually complaining, and there have been two distinctive voices.

So, what does this mean? However, this is the track where he gets really personal. Joyner is speaking to his son and asking for forgiveness because he originally wanted an abortion. He comes off very open and genuine on this track and it is heartwarming when he talks at the end about how much his son means to him now. However, in the third verse, Joyner realizes that he too has become the same way despite his efforts not to. The one twist is that he tried to avoid this mentality himself, but it still ended up taking over him.

If he had expanded on that idea and gone into why that happened, maybe the track would be more interesting, but he kind of just glosses over it at the end. On this track, Joyner has an argument with his dick. Yes, you read that right. He really takes rapping from different perspectives to another level here because his main argument in this song is that he and his dick are completely different.

While he wants a long-lasting, serious relationship, his dick just wants to have sex. He criticizes his dick for sabotaging all his relationships, and his dick actually argues back. He is talking to his dick like it is a bad friend that is ruining his life and he has to cut it off. After he cuts off his dick, he calls the suicide hotline.

The moment kind of makes the humor of this track awkward because it transitions into such a serious moment. At the end of the verse, he kills himself, and the second verse is his friend talking to his dead body. This is by far the most powerful and moving song on the album. As for what he is saying, Joyner essentially shows his devastation and anger with his friend for killing himself. The music video also does a fantastic job of illustrating the point and showing how neglected and ignored the problems of the man were before he killed himself.

In the beginning, Joyner talks about how his life has changed and he is constantly out partying and hitting clubs. Then, a voicemail plays where a girl tells him she is lonely and wants him to come over. Joyner comes over and the song speeds up. He becomes incredibly possessive of her and tells a guy never to text her again when he texts her at 2 AM. The song ends abruptly with no explanation of the significance of the phone number or voicemails. As for the track itself, it seems like Joyner is trying to talk about how loneliness can affect people.

As Joyner has stated in interviews, he has gone through a lot of the things he is rapping about, such as selling drugs, going to jail, etc. It gives a feeling of authenticity to the subjects in this album. The project is filled with stories about different people and their struggles, and Joyner does a great job of rapping from their perspectives.

The other people tend to have struggles related to growing up broke in the hood, being addicted to drugs, gangbanging, and things along those lines. Most songs are very different from each other, so it kind of feels more like a mixtape in that regard, which actually helps the project. However, the lack of theme is also part of a big problem with the album because it lacks depth in some cases. Also, why add confusion with all the voicemails?

Most of the time, they are used to transition from one song to the next, but some of them are just strange. They feel like a gimmick masquerading as something more meaningful than they actually are.

On , Joyner comes through with a very solid project. Most of the album is hard-hitting, fast-paced rap that can be refreshing in our current state of music. You can also feel his hunger and drive throughout the project. Something he is remarkably good at is rapping from other perspectives, and it makes this project a lot better and more universal.

However, the good tends to outweigh the bad, and his versatility is evident because a lot of his best songs are good for very different reasons. Joyner shows here that he is really growing as a rapper and everyone should be looking forward to his future work. Thank you for reviewing this album.

You must be logged in to post a comment. Joyner Lucas: Album Review. The song features a nice xylophone on the beat.

Lucky You (Originally Performed by Eminem Ft. Joyner Lucas) - Karaoke Version testo

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Check it out above, and stream Jungle Rules here. A week ahead of schedule, NPR are allowing fans to stream the album in full via their website. The long-anticipated debut was executive-produced by No I.

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Joyner Lucas released his second album, , on June 16, The album is made up of 16 tracks and contains features from Mystikal, Snoh Aalegra, and Stefflon Don. On this new project, Joyner does a great job of showcasing his talent, particularly in his fast rapping speed, ability to rap from different perspectives, and use of serious topics. However, his shortcomings are also present. The songs sometimes go on too long, his lack of vocal talent hurts him at certain points, and his attempts to tie the album together thematically are a little spotty. In most cases, the reply given to his voicemail will lead into the next song in some way, kind of like what Kendrick Lamar did on his revolutionary album To Pimp a Butterfly. On the next song, Joyner reflects on how his life has changed throughout the course of his career.

Joyner Lucas: (508) 507-2209

Louis Senior High School to becoming the first woman to earn more than 7, points in the heptathlon, Jackie Joyner-Kersee has come to be known as one of the greatest athletes of all time — but what she has done off the track continues to be her true legacy. At the age of 19 and on a full basketball scholarship at the University of California, Los Angeles, Joyner fixed her attention on training for the Olympics and sprinted through the history books. Joyner made her professional debut at the Summer Olympics winning silver in the heptathlon, an event comprised of seven different events. In she became the first American woman to earn a gold medal in long jump as well as the heptathlon.

Founded in by John H.

Joyner Lucas is officially in the building. Today June 16 , the Worcester Mass. The new project checks in at a healthy 16 tracks, and features appearances from Mystikal , Snoh Aalegra and Stefflon Don. Executive-produced by Boi-1da, is a showcase of the sort of technical mastery that made Joyner into one of rap's most exciting up-and-comers.

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Account Options Sign in. Founded in by John H. Johnson, it still maintains the highest global circulation of any African American-focused magazine.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Look What You Made Me Do (Instrumental)

After never hearing about Joyner Lucas before, I decided to give his album, , a listen. The album is weaved together with a voicemail at the end of nearly every track and while listening to the album I was confused by this; however, it seems to me that the voicemails use the album to portray how easy it is to get caught up in a new fast lifestyle and lose not only yourself but your friends and family. Despite not being a fan of his voice, I am a fan of the voicemail concept- that is if I am anywhere close to right Collect from YouTube Sign Up. Album by Joyner Lucas.

Look What You Made Me Do (feat. Stefflon Don)

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Stefflon Don) MP3 Song by Joyner Lucas from the album Download Look What You Made Me Do (feat. Stefflon Don) song on riaddesnations.com and  Missing: instrumental ‎| Must include: instrumental.

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Look What You Made Me Do (feat. Stefflon Don)

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Look What You Made Me Do | Taylor Swift | Cover By AiSh |

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Stream Joyner Lucas’ New ‘508-507-2209’ Album

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Comments: 4
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