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How do employers look at your facebook

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Picture job searching as a two-way mirror. And on the other side is your potential employer who can now look in every nook and cranny online to learn all about you. And what they find could give you a leg up, but it could also disqualify you from your dream job. So the big question is: What could hiring managers ding you for after searching you online? What boots you out of the running?

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Employers ask job applicants to open Facebook profiles

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Looking for a job? Highlight your ability, not your experience - Jason Shen

Dear Job Applicants, This Is What Employers Actually Want to See on Your Social Media

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Scrolling through your photos from this past weekend and laughing at the debauchery of your Hangover-esque charades? Ranting about your current job or co-workers because you think you're just among "friends? According to a new CareerBuilder survey , 70 percent of employers use social media to screen candidates before hiring, which is up significantly from 60 percent in So pause before you post — if you think it could be questionable or inappropriate, you should go with your gut.

So, what to flaunt vs. Social recruiting is now a "thing" when it comes to hiring candidates — 3 in 10 employers have someone dedicated to solely getting the scoop on your online persona. Employers are searching for a few key items when researching candidates via social networking sites as good signs to hire:. And they aren't stopping there either — 69 percent are using online search engines such as Google, Yahoo and Bing to research candidates as well, compared to 59 percent last year.

The no-nos when using social networks With more than half of employers 54 percent finding content on social media that caused them not to hire a candidate, why take your chances? Pause before you post and remember these key reasons that employers were turned off by a candidate's online presence:.

Using social media to your advantage You don't have to look at your online persona as problem. There are things you can do on Twitter or Facebook that can actually up your chances of employment.

Use it as an opportunity to stand out in a positive way and showcase your personality. In fact, more than 44 percent of employers have found content on a social networking site that caused them to hire the candidate. Among the primary reasons employers hired a candidate based on their social networking site were: candidate's background information supported their professional qualifications 38 percent , great communication skills 37 percent , a professional image 36 percent , and creativity 35 percent.

But don't avoid the stress all together by deleting or hiding your profiles. Believe it or not, this can be even more detrimental to your brand. Fifty-seven percent of employers are less likely to call someone in if the candidate is a ghost online. The bottom line? Think before you post, because there's always someone watching. Don't put anything online that you wouldn't want your mom, grandma, dad, uncle, best friend's mom or cat to see or read. Tweet CareerBuilder : Do you have any other top tips to positively promote yourself on social channels?

Heard of any success or horror stories to share? Skip navigation. Find out why employers are searching your social profiles - and what they're looking for. Employers are searching for a few key items when researching candidates via social networking sites as good signs to hire: Information that supports their qualifications for the job 61 percent If the candidate has a professional online persona at all 50 percent What other people are posting about the candidates 37 percent For any reason at all not to hire a candidate 24 percent And they aren't stopping there either — 69 percent are using online search engines such as Google, Yahoo and Bing to research candidates as well, compared to 59 percent last year.

Pause before you post and remember these key reasons that employers were turned off by a candidate's online presence: Candidate posted provocative or inappropriate photographs, videos or information: 39 percent Candidate posted information about them drinking or using drugs: 38 percent Candidate had discriminatory comments related to race, gender or religion: 32 percent Candidate bad-mouthed their previous company or fellow employee: 30 percent Candidate lied about qualifications: 27 percent Candidate had poor communication skills: 27 percent Candidate was linked to criminal behavior: 26 percent Candidate shared confidential information from previous employers: 23 percent Candidate's screen name was unprofessional: 22 percent Candidate lied about an absence: 17 percent Candidate posted too frequently: 17 percent Using social media to your advantage You don't have to look at your online persona as problem.

Add your resume and let your next job find you. Add Your Resume. What you miss out on when your social media profiles are invisible to employers Read more Employment-related social media you should be using Read more Creative ways to get noticed by employers on social media Read more Veterans growing less satisfied with their jobs Read more

Employer-Proof Your Facebook

More employers than ever are using social media to snoop on candidates, a survey by CareerBuilder has found. Anxious job seekers might be tempted to thwart employer spying by deleting their profiles entirely. Not so fast.

Chances are, your profile activity includes cat memes, humorous videos, and the occasional status update. But what if a potential employer had access to your Facebook? Would you change what you share online?

Sometimes bosses just flat-out ask for your email address and password so they can log in. This is a flagrant violation of privacy of course, but just how much of this snooping are they legitimately able to get away with? Many countries now outlaw this behavior. While India grants citizens a right to privacy, several states in the U.

What Employers Are Thinking When They Look At Your Facebook Page

In the minds of many, social media checks have joined resume reviews, interviews, and criminal history checks as a standard part of all hiring policies. Now, say you are an entrepreneur or business owner, and you are looking to hire new employees for the first time. You need to design a screening process that will filter out the weak applicants, eliminate unsavory individuals, and find you a perfect candidate. After you begin considering doing social media checks of your applicants, your first question will probably be about how to go about doing them. It should be a clue to you that no background check company offers a service for social media checks. These firms will do virtually any kind of background check that is legal and fair, from searching criminal records, to checking financial history, all the way to verifying educational credentials and checking references. They will not do social media checks, though. If you want to do these checks, you are on your own.

The top three things that employers want to see in your social media profiles

When doing a self-search, does your personal website show up on the first page of results? Is the content displayed about you positive, accurate, and relevant? These are two important questions you should be asking. Below are some other things to consider when you do a self-search on the Internet.

Job Title, Keywords.

Here are four reasons that thorough recruiters care about your Facebook friends:. Every company has a different view on things like drinking, smoking, drugs, cursing, and professional conduct. For example, if your profile is squeaky clean, but every person in your friends list has a profile flooded with updates about their latest late-night binges, some employers might take this as a bad sign.

Do future employers check social media accounts before interview?

Facebook started as a way for college students to connect and keep up with one another, but the social media site quickly became much more than a university-only playground. Now, adults, teens and even the elderly set use the site to stay in touch with friends and loved ones. With open access to all, though, your profile has the potential to fall into the hands of a potential employer.

Many employers conduct professional background checks on potential employees before deciding whether to hire them. However, some employers may also investigate a potential employee's social media profiles, such as a Facebook page. In most cases, an employer can only view your private Facebook page if you allow it. Facebook is a social networking site that allows users to create profiles and connect with friends and acquaintances. If you create a Facebook profile, you can upload photographs, send public and private messages, publish writings for your friends to read and post status updates about happenings in your personal life.

Should Employers Check Facebook Before Making a Hire?

More than half of employers admit to snooping at potential employees' social media pages. You might want to think twice about posting that picture of you leaving a nightclub looking bug-eyed in the company of a woman of ill repute to your Facebook page if you're in the market for a new job. There's a good chance any recruiter you send a job application to will have a go at checking out your social media footprint before even thinking about inviting you for an interview. Employers can and do check out potential employees' Facebook profiles if they can get access to them. Some 56 percent of employers said they were likely to look at the social media presence of potential employees before hiring them, according to a study from British business psychology firm OPP.

May 2, - Still think hiring managers aren't checking your Facebook or LinkedIn and stance: 70% of employers in used social media to screen candidates, Let's take a look at what you can do to prep your social media profiles.

Just how accurate are social profiles in determining the personalities and capabilities of your prospective employees? Here are a few pros and cons of using this approach in screening candidates. An example is if the employee in question works in public relations, advertising, marketing, sales or other industries that otherwise serves as a representative of a certain company. In that case, employers are allowed to ensure that the employee is not being an embarrassment to the company.

70% of employers are snooping candidates’ social media profiles

By Interview cheat sheet. Love it or loathe it, social media usage has rocketed in the last decade and with it, privacy has flown out of the window like a Twitter bird. Many spill their guts on a number of social media websites, the most popular being Facebook, Instagram and Twitter — and the favourite of the working professional, LinkedIn.

What you post on social media could have serious repercussions on your professional life. It could cost you your current job or future job opportunities. Employers look at social media accounts for an array of reasons, but many want to make sure a candidate will be a good fit with their company.

Scrolling through your photos from this past weekend and laughing at the debauchery of your Hangover-esque charades? Ranting about your current job or co-workers because you think you're just among "friends?

If this is your first time registering, please check your inbox for more information about the benefits of your Forbes account and what you can do next! Why interview when you can Facebook stalk? Yesterday, I told you about a study suggesting that employers can judge candidates' future work performance by spending five to ten minutes lurking on their Facebook pages. Some readers were outraged by this.

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